A SERIES ON THEOLOGICAL PRAXIS, OR PRACTICAL THEOLOGY

CONTENTS with excerpts:

1. oops, I used the “T” word

“Theology is a word that seems to bring terror to some people’s hearts, cause others to roll their eyes back in their head and, at the very least, make some folks think of a deranged, reclusive, scholarly pastor sitting amid a room full of books reading under candlelight. … Theology as something we think can be important, but theology as something we do – well, now, that’s just plain powerful. ” 

2. Sorting It Out

“Critical to the development of a theology is the starting point – the experiences, learned biases, cultural preconceptions, and possible misconceptions which permeate our basic understandings – essentially our social locations. … The experiences of my life, as well as probably some basic character traits or even flaws, have worked together to make me suspicious of the absolute values and beliefs that authorities and culture promulgate. “

3. Forming Identity

“Since theology is subject to constant change and growth, based to our ongoing experience in God’s creation, identity and praxis are also under pressure to change. Praxis is, in its most straightforward sense, how we live our theology. … By extrapolation, theology is also a work in progress of the minds and souls of humans as yet still developing as a result of previous shifts in theology.”

 4. Sources

“Our sources of theology deserve the same scrutiny, for many of the same reasons, as our worldviews. The commonly held sources – scripture, tradition, revelation, reason and experience – are impossible to fully separate one from another. ” 

5. The Effects of Social Location and Experience

A common response is to claim that they have no effect, since we hold only the standard, right beliefs that everyone should. That statement alone shows a life lived in conformity to tradition, and seeking full benefit of dominant culture. Theology, as the expression of our faith, requires wrestling out in fear and trembling. To do otherwise is not to worship God, but a static tradition – and that is idolatry.

6. What We “Know” of God 

What I hoped to show is that developing theology is based on a process – a continuous process, at that – in which we actually have to contend with what we believe, and consider how the consequences play out in our reality (”our” meaning human reality, as opposed to God’s reality). Un unexamined theology risks becoming an idolatry, with that which is idolized being our own rigid dogma.

7. Putting Hands and Feet On It

What I hoped to show is that developing theology is based on a process – a continuous process, at that – in which we actually have to contend with what we believe, and consider how the consequences play out in our reality (”our” meaning human reality, as opposed to God’s reality). Un unexamined theology risks becoming an idolatry, with that which is idolized being our own rigid dogma.


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... or, preaching from both ends

WELL, HELLO! YOU’RE HERE.

That's too bad - I'm so sorry. Oh, well, just try to make the best of it. What you'll find here is a variety of essays and ramblings to do with things theological, social, whimsical and, sometimes, all three. I don't write to get famous - trust me, I've been told how futile that would be - but to express myself. I love to communicate and browbeat - ummm, I mean dialogue - about the things I find intriguing. Since you're here, and the door's locked, why don't you stay a while. There's a page bar under the header with links to information about us - I mean me. Don't forget to tell me what you think - in a nice way, I mean.

Readers since Jan 2009

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